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Picture of Buddhist Art

Volume 58 Number 3, March 2007

Buddhist Art

Form & Meaning


Edited by:  Pratapaditya Pal

Price:   Rs 2500 (INR) / $66 (USD)
Binding:   Hardcover  
Specifications:   132 pages, 100 illustrations  
ISBN:   978-81-85026-78-7  
Dimensions:   305 x 241 mm

    Both spatially and temporally, the scope of this book is expansive. Spatially, the eight essays cover a vast swathe of Asia stretching from Mathura in India to Thailand in Southeast Asia, including the Himalayan region. Temporally, the period covered is over a millennium from the 1st century bce to the 10th century ce. Conceptually, the essays cover both the so-called “aniconic” or the early phase, when Buddha Shakyamuni was not represented in art in the human form as well as the “iconic” period when he began to be portrayed as a divine figure. Each of the eight essays provides fresh material as well as new interpretations of familiar symbols and images.


    Pratapaditya Pal is the General Editor of Marg Publications. He has been associated as curator with leading American museum with Indian collections and has taught in several universities. Recognized as an authority on the arts and cultures of the subcontinent, the Himalaya and Southeast Asia, he is a prolific author with over 60 publications.

    Introduction
    Pratapaditya Pal

    Pipal Tree, Tonsured Monks, and Ushnisha
    Gautama Vajracharya

    The Representation of the Buddha’s Birth and Death in the Aniconic Period
    J.E. Van Lohuizen-De Leeuw

    Observations on “The Representation of the Buddha’s Birth and Death in the Aniconic Period”
    Sonya Rhie Quintanilla

    An Unusual Naga-Protected Buddha from Thailand
    Pratapaditya Pal

    The Naga-Protected Buddha in the Norton Simon Museum: Further Comments
    Joyanto K. Sen

    The Karandavyuha Sutra and Buddhist Art in 10th-Century Cambodia
    Hiram Woodward

    Do Jewelleries Provide Chronological Clues? A Preliminary Study of Wrathful Deities in Pala and Tibetan Art
    Steven Kossak

    A 16th-Century Ladakhi School of Buddhist Painting
    Erberto Lo Bue

    A Pilgrim to the Buddhist Himalayas
    Jaroslav Poncar